F
James Adonis Homepage Contact James
About James
Speaker & Facilitator
Consultant
Coach & Mentor
DiSC Profiling
Development Program
Books
Media
Newsletter
With Compliments
Testimonials
Contact James
Homepage
 
Speaker & Facilitator Consultant Coach & Mentor DiSC Profiling Development Program Contact James

 

Managing Generation Y - 16 February 2010

In Greek mythology, Zeus ruled Mount Olympus and was the god of the sky and the thunder. This king of gods was also a master at metamorphosis.

To seduce Leda, the queen of Sparta, he transformed himself into a beautiful swan. To get Princess Danae pregnant, he appeared to her as a shower of gold in the prison where she was locked up. To capture the Phoenician princess Europa, he disguised himself as a bull. To win the heart of Alcmene, he adopted the body of her husband. To make the Trojan prince Ganymede his lover, he became an eagle and abducted him.

He did whatever it took to win over the people who could give him what he wanted – and often that involved becoming someone (or something) else. Here’s how this applies to Gen Y.

I've delivered heaps of Gen Y presentations and so many Gen X'ers and Baby Boomers have told me afterwards that, "Everything you've said also applies to me. I'm just like Gen Y." This eventually led me to review the books I’d previously read on the topic and I quickly realised that much of what is in these texts similarly applies to all the other generations, too.

Sure, there are some attributes that define each generation. As we grow, events during our formative years shape our attitudes and perspectives on life. But really, most people want a work/life balance – not just Gen Ys. Many of us want an inspirational boss – not just Gen Ys. Everyone I know wants enjoyable and meaningful work – not just Gen Ys. The biggest difference is that Gen Ys demand it in the workplace. The others generally don't.

So where does this leave us? Well, if you adopt a leadership style where you "manage by generation", you’ll disengage the Gen Ys who act like Baby Boomers and the Boomers who act like Gen Ys. For example, if a manager tried to manage me in the way they're told to manage Gen Ys, they wouldn’t succeed because I don’t fit the standard Gen Y stereotype.

Manage people not based upon the year they were born but the person they are:


- There are seven main ways to motivate employees. Instead of using the two that are most common among Gen Ys (curiosity and cooperation), discover the specific motivator that uniquely excites each individual employee. And use that.

- There are four main types of communication styles. Instead of using the two that are most common among Gen Ys (expressive and direct), identify each individual’s preferred communication style. And use that.

- There are four major methods to stimulate learning. Instead of using the two that are most common among Gen Ys (visual and kinaesthetic), find out the most effective learning method that suits each individual team member. And use that.


This means being more like Zeus. With some employees, you might need to be a swan. With others, you might have to be an eagle or a bull. But no matter what form you choose to take, always manage by individual (not by generation), because the most amazing managers know they need to be masters at metamorphosis to get the best out of their people.

 

To download complimentary e-books on employee engagement, retention, and recruitment (valued at over $100), please click here.

 

PO Box 1277
Potts Point NSW 1335
Australia

Phone: + 61 2 9331 2465
Fax: + 61 2 9331 3945
Mobile: + 61 402 334 987

Email:

About James | Speaker & Facilitator | Consultant | Coach & Mentor | DiSC Profiling | Development Program | Books
Media
| Newsletter | With Compliments | Testimonials | Contact James | Homepage
Privacy Policy & Disclaimer
Endorphin Interactive